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Quality Measures

Blood Clot Prevention

Because hospital patients often have to stay in bed for long periods of time, any patient who is admitted to the hospital is at increased risk of developing a blood clot in the veins (known as venous thromboembolism). Blood clots can break off and travel to other parts of the body and cause serious problems, even death. Fortunately, there are safe, effective, and proven methods to prevent blood clots when they occur.

The measure listed below show how well hospitals are providing recommended care known to prevent blood clots and how often blood clots occur that could have been prevented.

Blood Clot Prevention

Patients who developed a blood clot while in the hospital who did not get treatment that could have prevented it

Abington Hospital 0% *
Abington – Lansdale Hospital Not Available * **
Pennsylvania Average 1% ***
National Average 2% ***

Lower percentages are better.

What It Is and Why It Is Important

  • Because hospital patients often have to stay in bed for long periods of time, all patients admitted to the hospital are at increased risk of developing blood clots in their veins (also called venous thromboembolism or VTE) that can break off and travel to other parts of the body, like the heart, brain, or lung.
  • Hospitals can prevent blood clots by routinely evaluating patients for their risk of developing blood clots and using appropriate prevention and treatment procedures. Prevention can include compression stockings, blood thinners, and/or other medicines.
  • This measure shows the percentage of patients who developed blood clots while in the hospital who did not receive preventative treatment beforehand.

footnotes:
* Data submitted were based on a sample of cases/patients.
** The number of cases/patients is too few to report.
*** State and national averages do not include VHA hospital data.

Source: The information was provided from Hospital Compare (Data Collection period: 4/1/2016 through 3/31/2017), a quality tool developed by the United States Department of Health and Human Services. You may use the information in Hospital Compare together with the other information you gather about hospitals as you decide where to get hospital services. You may want to contact your health care provider, your State Survey Agency or your state Quality Improvement Organization (QIO) for more information. If you have a complaint about the quality of the medical care you or a loved one received at a hospital, first contact the hospital's patient advocate. Or, contact your state QIO. If you have other complaints about a health care facility, contact your State Survey Agency. Additional information about hospitals may be found on the state websites.