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Quality Measures

Emergency Department Care

Timely and effective care in hospital emergency departments is essential for good patient outcomes. Delays before receiving care in the emergency department can reduce the quality of care and increase risks and discomfort for patients with serious illnesses or injuries. Waiting times at different hospitals can vary widely, depending on the number of patients seen, staffing levels, efficiency, admitting procedures, or the availability of inpatient beds.

The information below shows how quickly the hospitals you selected treat patients who come to the hospital emergency department, compared to the average for all hospitals in the U. S.

Timely Emergency Department Care

Average time patients who came to the emergency department with broken bones had to wait before receiving pain medication

Abington Memorial Hospital 47 minutes
Lansdale Hospital 45 minutes
Pennsylvania Average 56 minutes
National Average 54 minutes

A lower number of minutes is better.

What It Is and Why It Is Important

  • Long waits before a patient is treated may be a sign that the emergency department is understaffed or overcrowded. For patients with broken bones, long waits without pain medication cause unnecessary increased suffering.

Data Collection period: 10/1/2013 – 9/30/2014

Percentage of patients who left the emergency department before being seen

Abington Memorial Hospital 0%
Lansdale Hospital 0%
Pennsylvania Average 1%
National Average 2%

Lower percentages are better.

What It Is and Why It Is Important

  • Hospital emergency departments that have high percentages of patients who leave without being seen may not have the staff or resources to provide timely and effective emergency room care. Patients who leave the emergency department without being seen may be seriously ill, putting themselves at higher risk for poor health outcomes.

Data Collection period: 1/1/2013 – 12/31/2013

Percentage of patients who came to the emergency department with stroke symptoms who received brain scan results within 45 minutes of arrival

Abington Memorial Hospital Not Available *
Lansdale Hospital 64%
Pennsylvania Average 72%
National Average 64%

Higher percentages are better.

What It Is and Why It Is Important

  • People who suffer from strokes need to receive treatment immediately to lessen the amount of brain damage that occurs with any stroke. Before treatment can be provided, a scan of the brain must be taken to determine the type and severity of the stroke.

Data Collection period: 10/1/2013 – 9/30/2014

footnotes:
  *
The number of cases/patients is too few to report.

EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT VOLUME

Volume Legend (patients annually)

Low: 0 - 19,999
Medium: 20,000 - 39,999
High: 40,000 - 59,999
Very High: 60,000+

Abington Memorial Hospital: Very High
Lansdale Hospital: Medium

Data Collection period: 1/1/2013 – 12/31/2013

Average time patients spent in the emergency department, before they were admitted to the hospital as an inpatient

Very High Volume Hospitals:
Abington Memorial Hospital 312 minutes *
Pennsylvania Average 319 minutes
National Average 331 minutes
Medium Volume Hospitals:
Lansdale Hospital 284 minutes *
Pennsylvania Average 271 minutes
National Average 258 minutes

A lower number of minutes is better.

What It Is and Why It Is Important

  • Long stays in an emergency department before a patient is admitted may be a sign that the emergency department is understaffed or overcrowded. This may result in delays in treatment or lower quality care.

Data Collection period: 10/1/2013 – 9/30/2014

footnotes:
 *
Data submitted were based on a sample of cases/patients.

Average time patients spent in the emergency department, after the doctor decided to admit them as an inpatient before leaving the emergency department for their inpatient room

Very High Volume Hospitals:
Abington Memorial Hospital 128 minutes *
Pennsylvania Average 129 minutes
National Average 130 minutes
Medium Volume Hospitals:
Lansdale Hospital 116 minutes *
Pennsylvania Average 99.5 minutes
National Average 88 minutes

A lower number of minutes is better.

What It Is and Why It Is Important

  • Delays in transferring emergency department patients to an inpatient unit may be a sign that there’s not enough staff or there’s poor coordination among hospital departments. Long delays can also create more stress for patients and families.

Data Collection period: 10/1/2013 – 9/30/2014

footnotes:
 *
Data submitted were based on a sample of cases/patients.

Average time patients spent in the emergency department before being sent home

Very High Volume Hospitals:
Abington Memorial Hospital 151 minutes
Pennsylvania Average 142 minutes
National Average 169 minutes
Medium Volume Hospitals:
Lansdale Hospital 142 minutes
Pennsylvania Average 136 minutes
National Average 139 minutes

A lower number of minutes is better.

What It Is and Why It Is Important

  • Long stays in the emergency department before a patient is sent home may be a sign that the emergency department is understaffed or overcrowded. This may result in delays in treatment, increased suffering for those who wait, and unpleasant treatment environments.

Data Collection period: 10/1/2013 – 9/30/2014

Average time patients spent in the emergency department before they were seen by a healthcare professional

Very High Volume Hospitals:
Abington Memorial Hospital 17 minutes
Pennsylvania Average 24 minutes
National Average 32 minutes
Medium Volume Hospitals:
Lansdale Hospital 20 minutes
Pennsylvania Average 24.5 minutes
National Average 25 minutes

A lower number of minutes is better.

What It Is and Why It Is Important

  • Delays in being seen by a healthcare provider may be a sign that the emergency department is understaffed or overcrowded. This may result in delays in treatment or lower quality care. In addition, long delays can create more stress for patients and families.

Data Collection period: 10/1/2013 – 9/30/2014

Source: The information was provided from Hospital Compare, a quality tool developed by the United States Department of Health and Human Services.  You may use the information in Hospital Compare together with the other information you gather about hospitals as you decide where to get hospital services. You may want to contact your health care provider, your State Survey Agency or your state Quality Improvement Organization (QIO) for more information. If you have a complaint about the quality of the medical care you or a loved one received at a hospital, first contact the hospital's patient advocate. Or, contact your state QIO. If you have other complaints about a health care facility, contact your State Survey Agency. Additional information about hospitals may be found on the state websites.