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Quality Measures  

Colonoscopy Follow-up

A colonoscopy is one test doctors can use to find precancerous polyps (abnormal growths) or colorectal cancer. Scientific evidence shows that the following measures represent best practices for follow-up colonoscopies.

Percentage of patients receiving appropriate recommendation for follow-up screening colonoscopy

Abington Hospital 65%
Abington – Lansdale Hospital Not Available *
Pennsylvania Average 74%
National Average 74%

Higher percentages are better.

What It Is and Why It Is Important

  • The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for colorectal cancer beginning at age 50. A colonoscopy is one test doctors can use to find precancerous polyps (abnormal growths) or colorectal cancer. During a colonoscopy, your doctor can remove any polyps that are found.
  • Individuals between the ages of 50 and 75 who are not at high risk should have a colonoscopy every 10 years. For most people, the benefits of having colonoscopies more often do not outweigh the risks. Talk to your doctor about other types of cancer screening tests that may be right for you.
  • This measure shows the percentage of patients aged 50 to 75 years whose colonoscopy did not require removal of a polyp or a biopsy and who received a recommendation for having their next follow-up colonoscopy in 10 years.

footnotes:
*
The number of cases/patients is too few to report.

Percentage of patients with history of polyps receiving follow-up colonoscopy in the appropriate timeframe

Abington Hospital 69%
Abington – Lansdale Hospital 95%
Pennsylvania Average 85%
National Average 80%

Higher percentages are better.

What It Is and Why It Is Important

  • If your colonoscopy finds precancerous polyps, the length of time before you will need a follow-up colonoscopy depends on the size, type, and number of polyps removed.
  • In most cases, experts recommend waiting at least three years between the first colonoscopy that identifies the polyps and a repeat colonscopy.
  • Because colonoscopy has some risk of complications, the benefits of more frequent colonoscopies do not outweigh the risks, and is inappropriate in many cases.
  • This measure shows the percentage of patients aged 18 years and older with a history of polyp(s) in a previous colonoscopy who received a surveillance colonoscopy at least three years following their previous colonoscopy.

Source: The information was provided from Hospital Compare (Data Collection period: 4/1/2014 through 12/31/2014), a quality tool developed by the United States Department of Health and Human Services.  You may use the information in Hospital Compare together with the other information you gather about hospitals as you decide where to get hospital services. You may want to contact your health care provider, your State Survey Agency or your state Quality Improvement Organization (QIO) for more information. If you have a complaint about the quality of the medical care you or a loved one received at a hospital, first contact the hospital's patient advocate. Or, contact your state QIO. If you have other complaints about a health care facility, contact your State Survey Agency. Additional information about hospitals may be found on the state websites.