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  • ECOG E5202 - A Randomized Phase III Study Comparing 5 F-U, Leucovorin and Oxaliplatin versus 5 FU, Leucovorin, Oxaliplatin and Bevacizumab in Patients with Stage II Colon Cancer at High Risk for Recurrence to Determine Prospectively the Prognostic Value of Molecular Markers.

    Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Bevacizumab may also stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking blood flow to the tumor. Giving combination chemotherapy together with bevacizumab after surgery may kill any remaining tumor cells or prevent the cancer from coming back. Sometimes, after surgery, the tumor may not need additional treatment until it progresses. In this case, observation may be sufficient. It is not yet known whether giving combination chemotherapy together with bevacizumab is more effective than combination chemotherapy alone or observation only in treating colon cancer. This randomized phase III trial is studying oxaliplatin, leucovorin, fluorouracil, and bevacizumab to see how well they work compared to oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and fluorouracil or observation only in treating patients who have undergone surgery for stage II colon cancer. (NCT00217737)

  • NCCTG N0147 - A Randomized Phase III Trial of Oxaliplatin (OXAL) Plus 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)/Leucovorin (CF) with or without Cetuximab (C225) after Curative Resection for Patients with Stage III Colon Cancer.

    Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan, fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop tumor cells from dividing so they stop growing or die. Monoclonal antibodies such as cetuximab can locate tumor cells and either kill them or deliver tumor-killing substances to them without harming normal cells. Combining more than one chemotherapy drug with monoclonal antibody therapy and giving them after surgery may kill any remaining tumor cells. It is not yet known which combination chemotherapy regimen is more effective after surgery in treating colon cancer. This randomized phase III trial is comparing three different combination chemotherapy regimens to see how well they work when given with or without cetuximab in treating patients who have undergone surgery for stage III colon cancer. (NCT00079274)

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